The SpineJet System uses high-velocity water to predictably and safely pulverize the disc material and remove tissue through an evacuation tube.

The SpineJet System allows you to precisely remove disc material. You have complete control over how much or how little disc material to remove. This allows decompression to be performed efficiently.

After decompression, when the cannula is removed, the elasticity of the annular fibers shrinks the annulotomy. These factors potentially decrease the rate of recurrent herniations.

The SpineJet Percutaneous Access Set is available with a straight or curved cannula. The cannulated system has been designed to protect the nerve root without retraction and minimize the residual annular defect after decompression. The working cannula diameter is only 4.0 mm, and it is inserted into the disc space over a dilator rather than cutting the annular fibers.

HydroDiscectomy is performed percutaneously and eliminates the intraoperative nerve root manipulation commonly associated with surgical microdiscectomy. This can decrease the incidence of postoperative epidural fibrosis and the resulting radicular pain often experienced by patients who undergo microsurgical procedures.

Percutaneous HydroDiscectomy is a valuable tool for the right patients.
Indications include:

  • Patients who have failed to respond to conservative treatments longer than 3 months, such as physical therapy, medication, and rest
  • Contained herniated discs
  • Radiologic findings correspond to symptoms
  • Leg pain is more severe than low back pain
  • No instability in preoperative dynamic roentgenogram
  • Suitable for young and older patients regardless of disc hydration
(In part From Han HJ, Kim WK, Park CK, et al. Minimally invasive percutaneous hydrodiscectomy: preliminary report. Kor J Spine 6(3):187-191, 2009.)

HydroDiscectomy is not intended for:

  • Use on extruded disc fragments
  • Osteophytic impingement of the nerve root
  • Scar tissue entrapped nerve root from previous surgery
  • Spondylolisthesis
  • Spinal stenosis
  • Spinal instability
(From Han HJ, Kim WK, Park CK, et al. Minimally invasive percutaneous hydrodiscectomy: preliminary report. Kor J Spine 6(3):187-191, 2009.)


Physican Education Video